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Novo RPG da Obsidian The Outer Worlds [PC/PS4/XONE 2019] [Capa da GameInformer de Março]

renbh

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Tou começando a achar que vão fazer um concorrente ao Fallout, aproveitando que a Bethesda só ta fazendo merda.
Fallout 4 vendeu mais de 10 milhões de cópias, por mais que Fallout 76 tenha sido fracasso, as grandes franquias da Bethesda não tem muita concorrência.

Além disso, pelo que foi falado, o private division é um rótulo da Take Two que trabalha com estúdios em uma pegada mais indie. Não creio que seja um AAA, para tal teremos de esperar entrar grana da M$.

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PhylteR

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Outro jogo estilo Fallout seria uma maravilha mesmo. Até sair um novo Fallout decente, deve ser 2023.
 

Sieg Wahrheit

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Achei bacaninha só.

Tem as 2 coisas que mais detesto no New Vegas: Visual mais colorido (FO4 é fotorrealista perto disso aí) e humor forçado.

Pode ter um milhão de facções e escolhas diferentes, se for tudo nessa pegada bobinha não me atrai nem um pouco.
 

- SEAN -

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Obsidian's new RPG The Outer Worlds is not just sci-fi: it is exuberantly sci-fi. Blood red trees pepper valleys of strange cylindrical rocks and alien shrubs. A spaceship rumbles overhead, coming in for a landing at the nearest spaceport. Rings grander than Saturn's carve an arc across the horizon, and a field of stars shine impossibly bright in the afternoon sky. It's a world I already know I want to explore: the colorful vistas of No Man's Sky, but in an RPG that looks and feels very Fallout, just a million miles away and pre-nuclear armageddon.

It's an incredibly good time to be the creators of Fallout. Not Bethesda, the studio behind Fallout 3 and Fallout 4 and now the disappointing Fallout 76: It's a badtime to be Bethesda, with new Fallout 76 problems seemingly popping up every day. But it's a great time to be Tim Cain and Leonard Boyarsky, who designed the original Fallout and Fallout 2 in 1997/1998. From the hour of gameplay I saw in a recent demo at Obsidian's offices, The Outer Worlds looks like exactly the game anyone disappointed in Fallout 76's multiplayer focus will want to play: a first-person RPG shooter, with a focus on roleplaying above all else.


Call me the space cowboy

There are telltale signs all over that you're playing a game designed by Tim Cain and Leonard Boyarsky, if you know what to look for. One: there's never just a single path through a mission, but always the golden trifecta: fighting, talking, and sneaking. Two: a unique vibe stemming from what Boyarsky calls "the combination of my dark morbidity and Tim's silliness." Three: Bending over backwards to prioritize player choice in a world that's often silly, despite being all shades of gray.

"We can't seem to get away from it, not that we want to. That's what appeals to us," Boyarsky says. "The ability to not only make your own decisions, but also not having a clear-cut 'what is the best choice, here?' That's where players have to start really thinking, 'what do I want to do as a character, as opposed to 'I always play the good guy, so I'm always going to pick helping people.'"

After two years of secrecy, the leads were eager to show off their game. The demo started on the player's personal spaceship, which you'll acquire in the first act and then use to hop between locations on a pair of planets at the edge of humanity's settled systems. You're a bit out of place: you've been pulled out of cryosleep after what should've been a fatal amount of time on ice, and from there you'll be thrust into the midst of a bunch of corporations and outlaws vying for power.

"You were part of a ship that got lost," Boyarsky says. "You've been frozen for 70 years. If you're frozen for more than 10 years, it's a really bad thing. This guy figured out a way to save you, and he needs you to help him get more chemicals to help save the rest of the colonists. But you don't have to help him do that. You can go to the 'evil board,' the Halcyon corporate board, and turn this guy in and see what happens if you do that."

"You get a lot of money," Cain adds.

One of the two main planets has been terraformed and is kinder to human life, while the other hasn't, making it home to more (and more dangerous) alien predators. Your ship will serve as a home base for you and your companions, much like Mass Effect's Normandy. You'll be able to chat with them and pick up companion quests, as they all have their own reasons for tagging along with you.

In an hour demo of The Outer Worlds, I watched them head to a small frontier town to respond to a distress call, then take a mission from a scientist to retrieve his previous research into hunger-suppressing toothpaste. Like everyone else in Outer Worlds, he works for a corporation: Everything is branded, and the megacorporation that sells you lunch is likely also manufacturing weapons or drugs.

"The idea that the game has been built around is that there's silly stuff and there's dramatic stuff, but it's not always like this separate thing," Boyarsky says. "This seems very silly, and hopefully humorous on the surface of it. They're making diet toothpaste, but this relates to a much bigger thing that's going on in the world."

Getting that research back involved sneaking into a facility, shooting some monsters that have gotten loose, and convincing the facility's guards that you're on their side... which led to their grisly death at the hands of some bandits patrolling outside.


Of course, it didn't have to play out like that. You could shoot your way in instead of sneaking, not bother talking to the guards, or actually ally up with them instead. Or you could promise to help a captured outlaw in the facility, then betray her. Opportunities for double-crossing abound.

The art style and gunplay of The Outer Worlds had me thinking of Bioshock again and again. It's hard to say until I get my hands on it, but the animation and impact of shooting look slightly stiff and simple, in the way shooter-RPGs often do compared to a Battlefield or Rainbow Six: Siege. But that didn't stop it from looking fun, with tons of choices to make both in how you approach combat and what weapons you use.

There are weapons that use light, medium and heavy bullet ammo, as well as energy weapons and melee. I saw two of the latter, a lightsaber-esque sword with a green laser blade, and a scythe with a sick, dripping blade of red energy fit for a sci-fi grim reaper. The damage you do will be based both on the stats of that particular weapon and your character stats.

Like in BioShock, weapons are moddable to do fire damage, shock damage, and so on, but you can also upgrade them to higher damage tiers. There's a nice zipto laser weapons and all the graphical effects look great, like they're straight out of a modern pulp sci-fi serial.

While your character has stats that affect damage, this isn't RPG combat with dice rolls governing whether your perfectly aimed shots hit or miss. Line up a headshot, and it'll hit. But for players who care more about the roleplaying than the shooting, the developers came up with a "time dilation" mechanic akin to Fallout's VATS. You can slow down time to help you aim, and while time's dilated a bit of UI pops up next to the enemy you're aiming at with info like their HP. It's an easy way to target individual body parts, though aiming is still manual, unlike in VATS.

One of the last features they showed us in detail is a new system called "flaws," which Cain says he's wanted to put into a game for years. Flaws are optional character traits you can accept after something happens in the game. For example, after fighting a group of vicious space dogs called Raptidons, you might get the option to take the flaw Raptiphobia, which will make you weaker in fights against them from that point on. Flaws are permanent, and you can have up to three of them (or five on a harder difficulty), but of course there's a trade-off: you get to take an extra perk immediately

"A flaw can be a fear of heights. There's my favorite, robophobia. We also have afraid of the dark. The game may go 'hey, you seem to catch on fire on fire a lot. Would you like to be susceptible to flame damage? If so, you can have another perk right now."


Whole new worlds

The area housing the research facility wasn't a narrow, linear path: there was definitely room to roam, with enemies and other locations to loot around the map. Outer Worlds isn't one massive contiguous world like today's open world games, but from what I've seen, that's a good thing. This is not a game made by 800 people, and the smaller environments look intimately hand-crafted, but are still big enough to hold sidequests and reward exploration.

One of the most exciting things the developers talked about was the freedom they're trying to bake into The Outer Worlds. "A lot of the map is opened up right after you get your ship, so you don't have to follow the story immediately," Boyarsky says. "There are points of no return, but we like to keep your options open for as long as possible."

There's a degree of level scaling on enemies, but within limits, which means you'll be able to travel to difficult places early, if you want, and reap the rewards--if you don't die. It looks and feels like a proper, open-ended PC RPG, but on a more conservative budget than today's blockbusters. I've only seen a small slice, so it's hard to say how unique the many paths through the game will feel, how rewarding it will be to take the "wrong" way and carve your own path.

But the setting has an invigorating freshness and personality to it for this type of game, and I think it's high time we got a campier, more sarcastic Firefly to Mass Effect's wannabe Star Trek.

Here are some other things I learned about The Outer Worlds:
  • It's out in 2019
  • It's an Unreal Engine 4 game
  • Your protagonist isn't voiced
  • There's a special class of "science weapons" that will have special, ridiculous effects, like a shrink ray
  • There's a full character creator even though it's first-person only (you'll see your character in the inventory, and if you leave the game idling long)
  • Your companions don't have separate inventories. Taking companions with you just gives you more inventory space to work with yourself
  • If companions really dislike the decisions you make, they'll leave and go back to the ship. You can persuade them to see things your way
  • No romancing companions. They considered it, but decided against it.
  • Companions each have a special attack (one named Felix does a double drop kick) but you can also equip them with whatever weapons you want
  • Hacking and lockpicking don't have minigames, and are simply based on your attributes
  • There are six skills (strength, intelligence etc.) and for every 20 points you put into one (up until 100) you'll gain a new perk
  • As in the creators' past games, you can play as a "dumb" character with stupid dialogue options. Your companions react appropriately.
  • They're still not sure if it will be possible to play through the game completely pacifist (but you'll almost definitely have to at least kill some robots)
  • Robots aren't sentient, but your ship's AI seems to have a strange degree of personality
  • Tim Cain wants you to know there are a lot of drugs, but he's not going to pressure you to take them
 

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The Outer Worlds
Six Big Takeaways From The Outer Worlds​


Yesterday, Obsidian and Private Division announced The Outer Worlds, a sci-fi RPG that looks to please Mass Effect and Fallout fans. In The Outer Worlds, players take on the role of a colonist who has just awoken from a long interstellar hibernation then sets off to explore a solar system with the ultimately goal of getting to the bottom of a corporate conspiracy that threatens to destroy everything humanity has built.

Tim Cain and Leonard Boyarsky are the game’s two co-directors, and both designers worked on the original Fallout as well as titles like Vampire: The Masquerade – Bloodlines, WildStar, and Diablo III: Reaper of Souls. We talked with Cain and Boyarsky and spent a day at Obsidian learning all we could about their special new project. Here are six reasons RPG fans should keep The Outer Worlds on their radar.


1) A Unique Take On Sci-Fi
The Outer Worlds is an epic sci-fi opera, but Obsidian’s take on sci-fi is a bit quirky. If you watched the game’s debut trailer, you might have picked up hints of BioShock, but Irrational’s classic wasn’t a direct inspiration. The team was initially inspired by Art Nouveau and Victorian sci-fi from the late 1800s. The Outer Worlds isn’t exactly steampunk, but its universe is filled with a lot of clunky technology and its environments feature a lot of heavy cables and piping.

“We like doing stuff that’s a little bit different,” says Boyarsky. “We wanted to make a sci-fi game, because we’re both big sci-fi fans. You can say Fallout is sci-fi, but it’s post-apocalyptic, which is a bit of a sub-genre. This seems like a good opportunity to go pure sci-fi, so we started to talk about corporations and the way they brand everything. We wanted to explore a future world in that vein. As we talked more, we were drawn to the robber barons of the late 1800s and how they controlled every aspect of people’s existence. That just felt like a really good fit for this.”

2) You Explore An Entire Solar System
Obsidian’s universe isn’t as big as a Mass Effect galaxy, but in The Outer World’s players will fly around an entire solar system aboard their own spaceship. We only got a taste of a few of these environments, but they seem sizable in their own right, and this diversity of locations gives Obsidian the opportunity to create a wide variety of ecologies.

Halcyon is the name of The Outer World’s solar system. It is the furthest colony from Earth and features two main planets humanity initially intended to colonized. However, once the colony ships arrived in the system they realized that only one of the planets as good for habitation, so while one planet is full of sleek technical marvels and gleaming skyscrapers, the other is a barren wasteland teeming with wild monsters. In addition to these two planets, players can explore several moons, asteroids, and space stations spread across Halcyon.

3) Goofy, Dark Humor
If you have any question about The Outer Worlds’ brand of humor, just know that you can play through the entire game as a dumb guy – literally, there is a dialogue option labeled [Dumb] that will let you role-play as a clueless brute. Halcyon is also filled with fat snakes that were bred for their leather, missions about diet toothpaste, and a rare weapon that works like a shrink ray to miniaturize your opponents.

“I think humor is really, really hard to do in a game, but games that go pure dark are hard to take in every night,” says Cain. “I play games that skew dark, and after a while I just don’t want to play them anymore. We like this kind of dark humor where we can put something in the game that also looks silly, but when you dig into it, you find out it’s really horrific.”

“You can actually get a lot darker and a lot deeper into things if it’s fun and humorous,” adds Boyarsky. “Getting deep into the human condition can be a little overwhelming, but if you are having a fun time and laughing and then we sneak in some of that depth and darkness, it actually resonates a little better.”

4) Open-Ended Problem-Solving
Obsidian looks to allow players to tackle The Outer World’s missions in a variety of ways. Charmers might work their way out of firefights with the right words, while thieves can bypass combat by finding a backdoor into most outposts. Those who choose to engage in The Outer World’s first-person combat will have the option to slow down time with a feature called tactical time dilation. This slow-mo feature allows players to look closely at enemies to gain information such as their level of health and other stats. Attacks made during tactical time dilation also do extra damage, but ultimately players will be able to approach every problem in their own way.

“We always ask ourselves, ‘How are people going to react in the game and what do we think they’re going to want to do,’” says Cain. “We added a lot of different playthrough paths. For combat, we have both melee and ranged, but players also have stealth and dialogue options. Then we have all the hybrids like what if you want to sneak through part of the map and then talk your way out of a jam. Or, what if you just want to kill everybody? We’re happy to say that you can kill everybody in the game and still finish the main story arc. You’d be a psychopath, but you could do it.”

5) Embrace The Fear
The Outer Worlds is constantly watching players and recording their actions. Ultimately, it will present new events that could leave lasting scares on your hero. At various times, the game will invite you to select a fear for your character. These fears are based on things that have happened to you. For example, if you take a lot of damage from a certain enemy type, you may be invited to develop a fear of that enemy, which means you will take extra damage those foes. In return to taking a fear, players will get to pick an extra perk to buff their character in other ways. This creates an interesting risk reward dynamic where players can choose to have some weaknesses in order to make themselves stronger. Once these fears have been chosen, they are locked in, but players can also choose to opt out of this fear system entirely.

“If you’re familiar with the works of Joseph Campbell – The Power of Myth and The Hero with a Thousand Faces – he always talks about how heroes are more interesting because they have flaws, so we incorporated the fear system,” says Cain. “The game’s flaws can be anything from a fear of heights to a fear of the dark, or you can be susceptible to different damage types. So the game might go, ‘Hey, I noticed you catch fire a lot. Do you want to be susceptible to flame damage?’ People are like, ‘Why would ever want to be susceptible to flame damage?’ But if you’re one perk away from something really cool, it can be really tempting.”

6) Companionship On The Spaceship
During your journey through Halcyon, you will meet a host of characters who will join your crew. These characters feature their own unique abilities, motivations, and ideals. As you get to know them, they will give you personal companion quests, and completing these missions could change their character. Companions will interject in the middle of conversations and buff your skills, but they might also leave your crew if they don’t like what you’re doing. We encountered one companion named Ellie, who is a tough, no-nonsense sharpshooter. Another companion, named Felix, is a sarcastic melee brute with a good intimidation skill. Unfortunately, you won’t be able to romance any of your companions.

“You encounter all the companions in the first third of the game, because it’s no fun getting a companion in the last hour,” says Cain. “They are designed to touch most of the major skills, so they are all different, but there is some overlap so there’s not just one guy who is really good at ranged attacks or one person who’s a good doctor. They also play off all the different ways a player can play. Like, if you’re playing a psychopath, we show how all these companions react to that. If you’re being really nice, not all the companions are going to be like, ‘Oh great, you’re a hero.’”


Given Obsidian’s lineage working on games like Fallout: New Vegas, South Park: The Stick of Truth, and the Pillars of Eternity, The Outer Worlds looks like the kind of game that RPG fans have been waiting a long time for. We enjoyed our brief taste of Obsidian’s unique spin on sci-fi and the studios bizarre humor, and we can’t wait to get our hands on the game in 2019 when it releases on PS4, Xbox One, and PC. For more, be sure to watch our New Gameplay Today video preview or watch the announce trailer.
 


AlxFire

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É um fallout da vida né, parece ser divertido!

Só não gostei muito da palheta de cores, está muito colorido.
 

Tigerfang

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Mais no hype pelos diálogos e opções de conclusões de quests ala New Vegas, mas o visual não me agrada nem um pouco.
 

Cyber King

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Visual bem genérico.

Talvez me empolgue com mais trailers posteriormente.
 

renbh

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Mais no hype pelos diálogos e opções de conclusões de quests ala New Vegas, mas o visual não me agrada nem um pouco.
A única coisa que tenho receio é dependência de skills para resolver problemas. Isso funciona bem em RPG de mesa onde o jogador que tem PENSAR na solução, em games onde basta escolher uma opção no menu vira um auto-win.

Foi algo que sempre atrapalhou RPG isometricos, chegava ao ponto de poder pular até batalha final no Tides of Numenera. Sou totalmente a favor de múltiplas soluções, mas quando uma delas é muito mais fácil que a outras se torna um exploit difícil de sair fora.

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G².

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Se esse jogo se sair bem nas reviews, vai ser o último prego no caixão de Fallout.
 

renbh

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Se esse jogo se sair bem nas reviews, vai ser o último prego no caixão de Fallout.
Sem chance, Fallout 4 vendeu mais de 10 milhões de unidades, Fallout 5 seguindo o mesmo caminho vai vender o mesmo.

Hoje, Elder Scroll e Fallout são como o CoD do RPG, não tem concorrência quando se fala de vendas.

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G².

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Sem chance, Fallout 4 vendeu mais de 10 milhões de unidades, Fallout 5 seguindo o mesmo caminho vai vender o mesmo.

Hoje, Elder Scroll e Fallout são como o CoD do RPG, não tem concorrência quando se fala de vendas.

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Bom, Fallout 76 vendeu precisamente 82.4% que Fallout 4, e os diversos problemas técnicos e polêmicas relacionadas à Bethesda não parecem que vão reverter a situação, então...
 

renbh

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Bom, Fallout 76 vendeu precisamente 82.4% que Fallout 4, e os diversos problemas técnicos e polêmicas relacionadas à Bethesda não parecem que vão reverter a situação, então...
Spinoff, mesmo os bons, dificilmente vende como série cheia, da mesma forma, pouco afeta a venda dos games principais.

Fallout 76 pode até dar algum retorno a longo prazo como ESO (mas não vai chegar perto de Fallout 4, os números dele são fora da escala para o genero), mas de qualquer forma são estratégias que não deram certo e devem fazer a Bethesda a focar no que já deu certo antes. Pode ter certeza que o próximo Elder Scrolls, que virá antes do próximo Fallout, venderá como água independente do que rolou no online.

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Night Sky

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Timothy Cain, criador de Fallout e uma das principais mentes por detrás de The Outer Worlds, falou com o GameStar e confirmou que num dos aspectos mais importantes, este é um jogo à moda antiga.

"Não existem micro-transacções no jogo. Compras o jogo e desfrutas dele para sempre."

Esta é certamente uma boa notícia para os fãs deste RPG focado na narrativa que manterá a tradição da Obsidian.

The Outer Worlds chegará em 2019 à Xbox One, PC e PlayStation 4, prometendo ainda uma história que será afectada pelas tuas escolhas, onde poderás construir um personagem e descobrir as histórias dos seus companheiros.
 

Tigerfang

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RPG Site: When you ask fans about what draws them to Obsidian's titles, a common theme tends to be that they love the writing, or love the story design. What do you think it is about Obsidian's games that resonates with fans this way?
Megan Starks: I think developers at Obsidian are passionate about both playing and making RPGs, and we have a specific focus for single-player games, which allows us to bring all sorts of different viewpoints to focus specifically on creating worlds that feel fully developed, especially from our writers. It's a strength of Leonard (Boyarsky) to create characters with different types of personalities, relationships, and motivations, and when we have a team of writers all bringing their varying strengths forward, it creates a really interesting mix.


RPG Site: What's it like writing for a single player experience such as The Outer Worlds or Pillars of Eternity compared to something entirely multiplayer like Wildstar?
Megan Starks: In a way, I enjoy it more because each player gets to help decide the story outcome and carry it with them. For instance, if there's a location in the game that's overrun by bandits and the player takes them out, that might result in local creatures retaking the zone afterward. For a multiplayer game where we have to account for several players that can enter or leave any location multiple times, different things get prioritized to make sure there's a consistent experience from player to player. It makes it much harder to have that sort of reactivity. You could always instance that sort of thing, but then the players couldn't see each other. So that was more writing an environment that supports players being able to engage with each other first and tell a story second, when now I can focus on designing an environment to tell a really cool experience for a single-player first.


RPG Site: A key component of The Outer Worlds is its companion system. From Tyranny to Pillars II to The Outer Worlds, has anything changed in scope or focus about how companions are designed?
Megan Starks: We want our companions to really emphasize that they have stakes that are important to them. They'll ask you to help out on their quests and they'll speak out against you if they don't support what you're doing, we want their motivations and goals to always be at the center of their character.


RPG Site: Just curious, are any companions mutually exclusive, or only available under certain playstyles, such as in Knights of the Old Republic 2? Or can you be a charismatic friend to everyone?
Megan Starks: You can recruit all of the game's companions, but some of them will have allegiances to specific factions in the game. For instance, if you decide to support the Board (Halcyon's enigmatic corporate entity), there will be certain companions that will clearly not agree with your decisions, but they won't abandon you unless you clearly decide to part with them.
[Update: Megan has since clarified that there are some actions the player can take which will result in a companion leaving.]


RPG Site: Can you tell me how many companions can be recruited in total?
Megan Starks: [Megan looks over at Obsidian PR Manager Mikey Dowling, who shakes his head.]


RPG Site: When you're coming up with a new character to insert into the story, whch sorts of aspects of their design that comes first, and what follows later?
Megan Starks: It depends on their role in the story -- companions are gonna be different than, say, a quest giver. General NPCs might be designed with questions in mind like 'what are we asking the player to do here?', and then after that point, we might come up with their specific personalities. With companions, it's more of the opposite -- they're fully written as characters first, and the most difficult part is trying to show why they might be, in a way, more important than other characters for a reason, and tie that into why they naturally want to ally with the player.


RPG Site: Did you ever consider having the main character voiced? We've seen similar RPGs from other studios decide to make the protagonist a voiced character in their games, but was the decision to keep the character in The Outer Worlds un-voiced made early or even really deliberated?
Megan Starks: We tend really stick to the foundation of our classic style RPGs here, and really want our players to be able to be whatever they want to be. We think players like to see their character in-game as an extension of themselves, and we didn't want to force a character, or even a voice, onto them.


RPG Site: At what point did The Outer Worlds go from being a general concept to actually becoming the point where you knew this game was going to be a definitive project?
Megan Starks: I think it was about April 2016, around when Leonard (Boyarsky) joined the team, or right before. To be honest, Tim and Leonard were already talking about it, and once he joined, then it was pretty much set.


RPG Site: So Leonard joined Obsidian pretty much for this project specifically?
Megan Starks: Yes. Tim had worked on Pillars, South Park, and a little Tyranny, but Leonard pretty much joined to work on The Outer Worlds straight away.


RPG Site: At what point was the partnership with Take-Two and Private Division formed?
Megan Starks: The conversation started in I think late 2016.


RPG Site: Now I have to ask about this, did The Outer Worlds project affect conversations with Microsoft about the studio's acquisition, or vice versa?
Megan Starks: Since The Outer Worlds was started well before those talks even began, it's been completely separate from anything related to that.


RPG Site: Have PC storefronts been decided on for that release of the game?
Megan Starks: It's not been decided. [Note: Since the interview took place, The Outer Worlds now has a Steam listing.]


RPG Site: In late 2017 a forum post declared that there would be no microtransactions of any kind in Obsidian's next title, can you confirm this is still the case?
Megan Starks: Yes.


RPG Site: Both Pillars of Eternity titles and Tyranny did see some post-launch DLC, are there any plans in place for if and how The Outer Worlds will be supported in the fashion?
Megan Starks: It's something we're discussing, but right now our focus is just on the core game.


RPG Site: Were there any aspects to The Outer Worlds that are unique to its setting that you haven't had to consider before in designing a previous project?
Megan Starks: This might seem like a smaller scale thing, but I think the Flaws are something wholly unique and pretty new, and I think they're cool. They're something Tim thought up, and they tie to this idea that the most interesting characters are the flawed ones.


RPG Site: Were there any new obstacles that you had to overcome on The Outer Worlds that you hadn't previously encountered?
Megan Starks: Customizing Unreal (4) to serve what we wanted to do was a bit of a challenge for us but we think we've done a great job adapting it to doing what we need it to. [Note: Obsidian used Unreal 3 in the development of Alpha Protocol, and had used Onyx and Unity in their more recent titles.]


RPG Site: In Fallout New: Vegas, the player is kinda nudged to make their way to The Tops near the beginning of the game, but they are otherwise left free to mostly go wherever they want. How does that compare to exploration freedom in The Outer Worlds?
Megan Starks: I think it's a bit of a mix. We wanted to provide a focused single-player story experience while leaving options open to explore the different environments. Once you get your ship, you'll have a lot of options to explore specific locations, with more opening up as you finish quests or purchase new passes in-game.


RPG Site: Pillars of Eternity II: Deadfire had some interesting difficulty settings and modes, such as Path of the Damned, Ironman Mode, and Magran's Fires challenges. Will we see anything similar in The Outer Worlds?
Megan Starks: We're still discussing the details, but we've got ideas for things like harder difficulty settings, such as being forced to take on any Flaws offered to you, and the like.


RPG Site: When a player reaches the end of a story-focused game like this, and you've got to bring in all of their wildly difference choices and experiences to a close, how do you design for that?
Megan Starks: [Laughs]. Well, it's quite a big endeavor. We try to do it in a set of levels. For instance, we'll first look at if the player has killed certain people or not by that point in the story, and then look at where the player's reputation lies for the remaining characters and factions, and so on. It's something that we learned a lot about when designing the ending of Deadfire, and we're in the process of sorting it all out for The Outer Worlds now.


RPG Site: So are there certain characters or quest-specific NPCs you're just not allowed to kill or have die?
Megan Starks: As a designer, I'm always tempted to just have it made so that you can't kill this person or that person! But we have a philosophy where we feel like it makes for a better gameplay experience to allow the player to do these sorts of things. You can even kill the scientist if you want.


RPG Site: So how many endings do you think this game has?
Megan Starks: I don't know [laughs]. There's are several!


https://www.rpgsite.net/interview/8062-the-outer-worlds-interview-with-senior-narrative-designer-kathryn-megan-starks
 

konde10

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Confesso que lembra muito um Bioshock que ao invés de ser no fundo do mar ou no céu, é no espaço, e que é quase um western... o que são coisas boas.

Não consigo comparar com Fallout, já que não existe o mundo apocalíptico.
 

renbh

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Não consigo comparar com Fallout, já que não existe o mundo apocalíptico.
Ele compartilha muitas características, já que é um game de "space opera" na fronteira da galáxia. Ainda assim você está correto, ele está bem mais para um Borderlands com elementos mais fortes de RPG, ainda mais se considerar que Fallout, mais que um jogo pós-apocalíptico, é um game com traços retro.

Só que os caras não são trouxas, estão aproveitando o flop do Fallout 76 para fazer propaganda em cima, uma vez que tem uma base de mais de uma dezena de milhões de usuários decepcionados. Bethesda vacilou, vai ser usada de escada, que aprenda a lição com o que está rolando.
 

Wastelander

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  • As in the creators' past games, you can play as a "dumb" character with stupid dialogue options. Your companions react appropriately.
  • They're still not sure if it will be possible to play through the game completely pacifist (but you'll almost definitely have to at least kill some robots)
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